International Activities

In order to comply with federal reporting requirements, beginning in FY 2011, the University will require additional information related to international expenses. In an effort to collect the required information in a timely and efficient manner, this information will be requested when processing expense reports and check requests. Definitions of an international and a domestic expense follow.

International expense generally refers to any goods or services used (it doesn’t matter if they are purchased in the US) in a country outside the United States or any expense related to travel for activities conducted outside the United States.  For example, supplies purchased in the U.S. but shipped and used for activities conducted outside the U.S. are considered international expenses.  Also, a limo expense incurred to travel to JFK to board a flight to London to speak at a conference represents an international expense.  Likewise, a hotel expense while in London to speak at a conference is an international expense. 

Domestic expenses generally relate to activities conducted within the U.S.  For example, expenses related to visitors traveling to the US to teach or speak at Yale represent domestic expenses.  Likewise the cost of staff working in the U.S. on an international program represents a domestic expense

FAQs

For a specific University business trip, the primary country of activity is the country related to the primary purpose of the trip. With respect to a trip involving travel to more than one country, please also indicate the country which represents the secondary purpose of the trip. 

While we recognize that individuals may conduct multiple activities in a country, we are requesting only the primary purpose for traveling to the primary country and likewise, if more than one country is visited on a trip, we are also requesting the primary activity for traveling to the second country. We are NOT asking for any information beyond the first two primary countries visited and the primary activities conducted in each of those countries.

Yes, travel expenses incurred in the U.S. are considered international expenses if the expenses relate to travel to or from outside the U.S. to conduct an activity outside the U.S. For example, a limo ride from New Haven to JFK to catch a flight to London to speak at a conference is treated as an international expense.

No, these expenses, even those incurred outside the U.S. or related to a non U.S. individual, would not be considered related to an international activity and should be considered domestic expenses.

Expenses incurred in the U.S. are generally not considered international expenses. However, if the expenses relate to goods or supplies that will be used outside the U.S., the expenses will be considered international expenses. For example, the cost of books or supplies that are purchased in the U.S. and that will be used outside of the U.S. for an international activity are considered international expenses. 

You should select the activity listed that most closely matches the activity for the country visited. If the activity is not listed then select the activity “Other mission related activities”. There is no wrong answer. You should use your best judgment in selecting the activity.

All expenses related to activities conducted in the U.S., including travel expenses from and back to the United Kingdom should be classified as domestic. However, expenses related to the activities of the consultant while in the United Kingdom or other countries should be classified as international expenses.

Someone might want to ask – “Where will the activity be performed or conducted?” If the activity will take place in the U.S., then the costs or expenses relating to that activity should be classified as domestic including all costs and expenses to travel to and from the U.S. If the activity will take place outside of the U.S., then the costs or expenses relating to that activity should be classified as international, including travel expenses to and from the non U.S. location.

Expenses relating to Canada and Mexico should be classified as an international Report Type. However, if these expenses include travel, you must use the domestic expenditure types in order to comply with federal agency guidelines.