Sachem's Wood Park open again

January 22, 2021

Sachem’s Wood Park is open! The long-neglected park, situated off Sachem Street and surrounded on three sides by several Yale science buildings, underwent an extensive renovation and reopened for visitors in January. The once desolate sloping hill is now a tidy park where people can sit, saunter, or study.

The park’s makeover included new landscaping, paving pathways, new stairs, new outdoor seating, and more lighting. Central to the redesign was creating a green space that connected Science Hill to the rest of central campus.

The revamp required removing dead and dying trees, planting new ones, adding sod, plants, and flowers. The curving walkways were designed to connect various buildings surrounding the area, including Kroon Hall, Klein Biology Tower, and the Yale Science Building. Materials used for the walkways include bluestone and Bomanite, a decorative concrete with pebbles hand seeded onto the surface.

All the walkways are bordered by a grey cobblestone runnel, designed for efficient water drainage. The stairs have a grooved path alongside them so people can walk their bikes easily up and down the steps. Benches are available throughout the park, ready to welcome people to sit and enjoy. Also, more lampposts were added, and all the handrails have lights. “I can’t wait until the spring when the flowers and plants come to life, the park will be quite spectacular,” said Mark Vernneau.

In the past, the park’s only defining feature was the Modern Head, a 31-foot-tall stainless-steel silhouette by the late artist Roy Lichtenstein. The sculpture, dedicated when Richard Levin became president, remains silently waiting for spring and the students to return to campus. *Scroll down to see photo gallery.

Special thanks to:

  •  Cathy Jackson, Director of Planning Administration
  • Sheri Miller, Director of Planning and Project Management
  • Kari Nordström, Director of Project Architecture & Design
  • Mark Veroneau, Construction Project Manager
  • Dimeo Construction Company
  • James Corner Field Operations – landscape architect